When a government pension plan just won’t cut it for today’s veterans


This morning, I was searching for news broadcasts about yesterday’s national protest rally when I came across LISTEN UP TV, a Canadian program that dedicated its time this Sunday to our veterans. Host Lorna Dueck introduces three unique perspectives of our veterans and their families about their experiences. A soldier’s body alone cannot heal  without the integrated healing of his/her mind and spirit.

Apart from our veterans’ stepped-up advocacy for government services and legislation to reflect these changes in the new “living” Veterans Charter, today’s vets require more unconventional support than vets through all previous wars. They must also pursue avenues of self-help to fill the gap in their care until their needs are fully supported by updated government attitudes and programs.

Why is it our public responsibility to care for our veterans? The nation has a moral contract with our soldiers: to look after them for the rest of their lives for standing up for God and country and for each one of us.

At the end of the program, Lorna asks viewers to respond to this question:  How do you think Canada should care for its returning veterans from Afghanistan?

Interview with Captain Wayne Johnston, founder of Wounded Warriors, who believes support of our veterans has to become a political issue Canadian people want addressed.

Interview with Corporal Chris Clote, a veteran of the Bosnian and Afghanistan wars.

Interview with Padre Greg Bailey (Capt.) about our veterans’ needs “when a government pension plan just won’t cut it.”

LISTEN UP.CA’s special TV program for veterans embraces body, mind and spirit 

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About Bonnie Toews and John Christiansen

Bonnie's Blog Posts invite our readers and free spirits everywhere to share life's adventures with us. I talk about writing my novels, reading books, chatting with other writers and John's and my journeys around the world. We welcome your anecdotes to our experiences and discussions.
This entry was posted in Afghanistan vets, Canadian Armed Forces, caregivers, depression, emotional trauma, Homecoming Vets, mental illness, physical disability, post traumatic stress disorder, veterans' assistance programs and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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